Gordon Bok's Guest Book
Let us know what you think
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Name Comments
Dot Pecson
Maryland
  
13 December 2009, 09:38 pm

Dear Gordon,

I love your songs and have learned several on my Celtic harp. Recently I had the honor of playing 'Brandy Tree' for a dying lady - and she gave me the last smile she ever had.

O-E-Dallay was the first song I ever learned on my harp... I totally love seals: they know the joy of play their whole life through, but when you look into their eyes you see the sadness of the Ages.

Thank you for your music.
Dot


Gordon
Maine
  
12 December 2009, 09:22 am

Thanks, Valentine. Shows how often I listen to myself. There is, however, a traditional song about recruitment whose hero is (I believe) an Arthur McBride. That's what was confusing me.
Onward, then.
G


Valentine
Connecticut
  
11 December 2009, 11:28 am

The Eric Bogle song about Willie McBride is called "No Man's Land." It's on Trickett, Bok & Muir's recording "The Ways of Man."

And hello to you both, Gordon and Carol. I hear you're snowed under up there.


' Strang
California
  
03 December 2009, 02:55 pm

Gordon, seeing the recent exchanges between you and Larry Meyer reminded me of an email exchange between you and me a couple of years ago in which I expressed hope for a DVD release. Since then the number of fine acoustic musicians with DVD releases has been steadily increasing. I would be so happy to see you in that group. Whether a live concert, or an instructional program or a guitar demo I think that such a documentation of your artistry would be a significant and valuable addition to our culture.

David


Ian Fyfe
Asia and Pacific - New Zealand
  
27 November 2009, 03:20 pm

Hi Gordon,

Earlier this year we visited Australia, and driving between Coonabrabran and Warrumbungles National Park we came across Bert Bok Bridge. Is this the uncle you mention in the sleeve notes to "Glen Ava Farewell"?


Gordon
Maine
  
25 November 2009, 11:09 am

Thanks, Anne; of COURSE it's Eric Bogle. I got two songs tangled up in my head, I guess. Not that uncommon around here.
Gordon


anne Neilson
UK - Scotland
  
23 November 2009, 05:22 pm

Dear Gordon,
Heard you several times in Scotland (Inverness, Ayr etc.), and would be thrilled if you were to visit again --Celtic Connections festival in Glasgow for two weeks each January?
Anyway, there was a mention of Willie McBride ; this was written by Eric Bogle, a Scot from the Borders now resident in Australia and probably best known for composing And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda.


Gordon
Maine
  
15 November 2009, 08:32 pm

Thanks, Al....hope you enjoy your time in Minnesota.
Gordon


Gordon
  
13 November 2009, 12:11 pm

Nina, that song about the river of fish is called Sarabande's Story, written by Valentine Doyle, aand I have recorded it for the next CD, which will be done some time this winter. Gordon


Nina
Colorado
  
08 November 2009, 10:52 am

Many heartfelt thanks for your music over all these years. We so enjoyed the concert last night at Swallow Hill... laughed much, sang along, came home with a lighter heart. I have a request, since my memory is pretty bad: Can you tell me the name of the song you sang, from the point of view of the boat, where the fishes were a ribbon from horizon to horizon? And is it on any of your CDs? All best wishes to you and to Carol.


Richard Cole
California
  
04 November 2009, 08:57 pm

Mr. Bok,

A number of years ago a friend of mine who lives in New Hampshire played a song you sang and I liked it very much. Its title is probably William McBride. I've checked on the internet and I can't find your recording of this song. Can you possibly direct me to a place where I could purchase it?

Thanks.


Richard


Gordon
Maine
  
31 October 2009, 09:38 am

Larry, it turns out that filmmaker is leaving town before the workshop starts. Sorry about that.


Larry Meyer
Massachusetts
  
30 October 2009, 09:02 am

Well yes, Id be grateful for catching on video what you say and show on your methods on the 12-string in dropped D. I have both your songbooks, but did not cotton on to the dropped d thing until seeing you, oh, in about 10 or so concerts over that many years. Im a very casual guitarist and what motivation I have is due really to being enchanted with the sounds you get out of that 12. Went so far as to get for myself one of Niks Bell models. As a master of the 12, youre right up there with Kottke in my book and better for your style.


Gordon
Maine
  
27 October 2009, 07:48 am

Greg, I forgot to say that the Spanish guitar I play was built by Ronald Pinkham of Woodsound Studios in Rockland ME.
The Twelve by Nikos Apollonio of Rockport ME, (though I've contibuted some to that design over the years.) Both fine luthiers, and right in my own dooryard...
Gordon


Gordon
Maine
  
27 October 2009, 07:27 am

Hi, Larry. Yes, I play the majority of my music in dropped-D, though it's not a habit I would encourage other players to get into...the Spanish tuning is really the most versatile tuning in the world, I think.
I believe there will be a filmmaker coming out to the Denver concert to get some footage; I'll ask him if he's interested in staying around for the workshop the next day...


Gordon
Maine
  
27 October 2009, 07:18 am

Thanks, Greg. I enjoyed that evening.
The song about the fox is called Bold Reynolds, written by Dave Toye from England, recorded by Martyn Wyndham-Read a couple of years ago, and by myself, yesterday. The Shepherd's Call is by Valentine Doyle, and it will also be on my forthcoming recording, and the one by the wall-builder is Stone on Stone by Dave Goulder of Sutherland, Scotland. It's on my recording Apples in the Basket.


Greg
Pennsylvania
  
22 October 2009, 01:42 pm

Mr. Bok,

I was able to catch your performance at the Patchwork Coffeehouse in Perkasie, PA last Saturday, and enjoyed the songs, music, and stories very much. Please return to eastern PA as soon as you are able. I'd like info about three songs in particular - the title, writer, and availability on your recordings. First, the one about the life of the fox (Beau Reynolds?) as told by the fox; second the one about the shepherd calling to the sheep and then to the creatures of the fields, mountains, homes, and seas; and third, the one about a year in the labors of a fieldstone fence mason (Stone Over Stone?).

"Pretty" is just a brilliant, engaging, touching, and wonderful work.

Were the guitars that you played of your own making?

We spoke for a moment in the snack line. I was very saddened to learn of the passing of Margaret MacArthur. I was a student of John at Marlboro some decades back. I've heard her sing and play there, at their home, and at the Philly Folk Fest - such a great person and lovely voice. I must play some of her vinyl records, drop a tear, and raise a glass to them both.

Until your next visit to PA, Godspeed, prosperous voyage, and calm seas.

Greg


Larry Meyer
Massachusetts
  
03 October 2009, 11:39 am

I see where out in Denver, youre doing a workshop on playing the 12-string guitar. Now that is something Id like to get to here someplace in New England. Any chance you could video that, or at least record your talk and post it here?

After going to many of your concerts and watching your hands, I figured out that you always play in dropped D. So that alters a lot of your chord shapes. And you use dropped D for keys of A, G, D, and sometimes C, right?


Gordon
Maine
  
17 September 2009, 03:27 pm

Dave, "Songs and sounds of the Sea " was made by National Geographic MANY years ago.....if you can find one of their custodians (preferablly a really old one) you could ask him to root around in the cellar for you.....beyond that, I couldnt guess. .
Gordon


Louis LaRocca
Connecticut
  
17 September 2009, 11:45 am

Gordon Thanks for touring and keeping sounds of the Maine coast alive. Hopefully we will see you in West Hartford. All the Best. Lou and Maura LaRocca


 
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